Navigation – Plan du site
Au-delà du New Deal / Beyond the New Deal
Introduction

About the Authors

Texte intégral

1Romain Huret is Associate Professor at Université Lyon II and a member of the Center of Research on North America at l’Ecole des Hautes Etudes, Paris (EHESS‑CNRS/UMR 8130). Specializing in the political and social history of XXth century United States, he currently works on antistatism in America. Romain.Huret@ehess.fr

2Isabelle Richet teaches American Studies and History at Université Paris 7. This article is part of a research project on religion and politics in the United States. She has published La religion aux Etats‑Unis (Paris : PUF, 2001) and has edited a special issue of Matériaux pour l'histoire de notre temps (september 2004) on Religion, Society, and Politics in the United States. Isabellerichet@wanadoo.fr

3Brigid O’Farrell is the UNITE Fellow with the Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project at the George Washington University, Washington, DC, where she is completing a book on Eleanor Roosevelt and the American labor movement. mbofarrell@aol.com

4Labor education materials from the Eleanor Roosevelt Labor Project are now available at :

5 http://www.gwu.edu/​~erpapers/​workers>www.gwu.edu/​~erpapers/​workers.

6Bill Issel is Professor of History and former director of American Studies at San Francisco State University and author of Social Change in the United States, American Labor and the Cold War, and several dozen articles and book chapters on aspects of culture and politics in modern American history. His next book will be The Deportation of Sylvester Andriano: Religion, Ethnicity, and Politics in World War II San Francisco. bi@sfsu.edu

7Stefano Luconi teaches American History at the universities of Florence, Pisa, and Rome TorVergata, Italy. He specializes in Italian immigration to the United States with special emphasis on the political experience of Italian Americans in the interwar years. His most recent book is L'ombra lunga del fascio (Milan : M&B, 2004) (written with Guido Tintori). Stefano_Luconi@yahoo.com

8Catherine Pouzoulet, a Professor at Université Charles De Gaulle‑Lille III (France) has written extensively on New York City’s policies and politics, in particular on issues of political representation, redistricting, charter revision, and redevelopment. She is currently working on the shift in public policies, as a result of the advent of financial capitalism and the global economy. After studying, through a case‑study of public transportation, how the public sector contributes to the deregulation of work relations, she is focusing on the role of public policies in reinforcing socio spatial segregation through a new phase of institutional gentrification, as may be observed through the redevelopment of manufacturing districts. catherine.pouzoulet2@freesbee.fr

9Claire Parfait is Associate Professor of American studies at Université Paris 7. Her research interests include book history in the United States and African‑American history. She has published articles on both subjects. She coedited a special issue of Cahiers Charles V devoted to the history of the book in the English‑speaking world (2002), and is currently completing a book‑length study The Publishing History of Uncle Tom’s Cabin in the United States, to be published by Ashgate. parfait@paris7.jussieu.fr

10Ninon Vinsonneau is currently teaching American civilization and culture at Ecole Centrale Paris and completing her Ph.D. dissertation on the WPA guidebooks and the reinvention of American national identity at Université Paris 7. ninon.v@wanadoo.fr

11Catherine Collomp, Professor of American Studies at Université Paris 7, has written extensively on the issues of labor and immigration in the United States. She is currently preparing an edition of the Abraham Plotkin Papers for publication at University of Illinois Press. This project is part of a larger study on American labor and the rescue of European socialists, 1933‑1945, with a main focus on the work of the Jewish Labor Committee. collomp@paris7.jussieu.fr

12Patel, Kiran Klaus, Assistant Professor of modern history at the Humboldt University, Berlin. Main research interests : modern and contemporary German history ; history of the European integration process ; trans‑Atlantic history ; transnational history. After completing a comparative study on the reaction of Nazi Germany and the United States to the Great Depression of the 1930s (« Soldaten der Arbeit : » Arbeitsdienste in Deutschland und den USA, 1933‑1945 [Göttingen : Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2003] ; English translation : Soldiers of Labor : Labor Service in Nazi Germany and New Deal America, 1933‑1945 [New York : Cambridge University Press, forthcoming]. Awarded the Prix de la Fondation Auschwitz, Brussels and the Tiburtius Prize, Berlin. I am presently working on the history of the European integration process, focusing on the Common Agricultural Policy (working title : « Transnationalization by Integration ? The Role of the Federal Republic of Germany in the EEC’s Common Agricultural Policy, 1957‑73 »). I am also co‑editing a volume comparing the histories of Germany and the United States in the twentieth century and another project, examining processes of Europeanization in modern European history, is in the pipeline. PatelK@GESCHICHTE.HU‑Berlin.de

13Annick Cizel is an Associate Professor of American history at Université Sorbonne nouvelle (Paris 3). A specialist of US Cold War policies in the developing world, she is currently finishing the revision of her PhD entitled « African and Middle‑Eastern Policies in the Making : The United States and Ethiopia (1953‑1958) » for publication in 2006. annick.cizel@wanadoo.fr.

14Nick Salvatore is the Neufeld Founders Professor of Industrial and Labor Relations and Professor of American Studies at Cornell University. The author of three major biographies, he is currently studying American political life in the aftermath of the New Deal. www.nicksalvatore.com nas4@cornell.edu

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence électronique

« About the Authors », Transatlantica [En ligne], 1 | 2006, mis en ligne le 24 mars 2006, consulté le 24 juin 2017. URL : http://transatlantica.revues.org/583

Haut de page

Droits d’auteur

Licence Creative Commons
Transatlantica – Revue d'études américaines est mis à disposition selon les termes de la licence Creative Commons Attribution - Pas d'Utilisation Commerciale - Pas de Modification 4.0 International.

Haut de page
  • Logo DOAJ - Directory of Open Access Journals
  • Logo AEFA - Association Française d'Etudes Américaines
  • Revues.org